Defining
Organizational
Value

The core meaning, or value, of your organization comes from your services and the value you deliver to customers. The core components of organizational clarity create a picture of your organizational value: your competition, your position in the market, and your clear and powerful vision, purpose, core beliefs, and objectives.

How are you connecting each component of organizational clarity and value to your employees and clients?

Have you defined the exact value of your services or products to your customers—from their point of view?

Six Core Organizational Clarity Components

Are the changes you are experiencing going to affect the purpose, vision, core beliefs, or objective of your company? Are you changing the value you bring to customers? Are you improving your position in the market? If so, then it’s time to reexamine your organizational clarity.

The clarity of each component will determine how customers understand and connect with your organization, what makes you unique in the market, and how employees connect their purpose and value to the work they do every day.

Core Organizational Clarity Components

We can help make all your core organizational clarity components align with the services and products you offer. Whether you’re a start-up or a complex business with multiple brands, we will work with you to ensure that each component has the clarity it needs to resonate with your employees and customers.

Organizational Clarity Case Study

Significant point of change:

New CEO, New Company Positioning and Core Values

Over the past 140 years, Bradford transformed from a small Rhode Island-based company making soap that cleaned wool and cotton to the world’s largest and most innovative manufacturer of specialty bar soap.

In 2016, Stu Benton became the new President and CEO. Working from Bradford’s long history of innovation, redefining manufacturing, and stimulating growth, Stu—with his forward-thinking spirit—sought to reinvigorate the company’s positioning statement and core beliefs. These needed to be communicated, understood, and integrated on all levels internally and would serve as the company’s guiding principles—informing how and where Bradford would grow and also acting as the basis for assessing all strategic options.



Defining Customer Value

The value of your services or products must be defined from the customer’s point of view. It is only when you know what your organization offers and what each customer needs and cares about that you know how to best convey the value of your services and products. With such clarity, you can create messages you know will resonate with your audience. This is how you build trust in your brand and connect your audience to your organization.

In a powerful yet simple one-page report, we deliver clear value propositions for each type of customer you are delivering value to—from their point of view.

Customer Value Case Study

Significant point of change:

Creating new services that customers want and need

Part of creating new services that clients want and need is to define the exact value from the perspective of the many different people in a company that will use this new service. We use a tool developed by Strategyzer.



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